Workflow and collaboration.

‘With the FreeView technology and various other fresh features, we are setting a new benchmark with regards to helping hospitals and users work efficiently while continually improving the delivery of affected individual care. We’ve incorporated an individual feedback we have received during the last 3 years into the new DX-D 100 with the purpose of creating the perfect portable imaging system. Within a cassette-much less and filmless solution, DX-D Retrofit offers a sponsor of benefits that improve workflow and speed up exam time. Agfa Automatic Exposure Recognition , or auto-triggering, based DR Retrofit allows for easy installation without the need for x-ray generator integration.

Werner, Ph.D., Joshua S. Shimony, M.D., Ph.D., Abraham Z. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., Marcus E. Raichle, M.D., John R. Witherow, M.D., Raymond Fang, M.D., Stephen F. Flaherty, M.D., and David L. Brody, M.D., Ph.D.: Detection of Blast-Related Traumatic Human brain Damage in U.S. Army Personnel In today’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the number of blast-related traumatic brain injuries could be as high as 320,000.3,4 No human being autopsy studies conducted by using current immunohistochemical methods5,6 have been published.7,8 Computer simulations of the effects of blast-induced pressure waves on the mind claim that coup and contrecoup regions may be at the mercy of high stresses.9,10 Simulations also claim that the orbitofrontal regions and the posterior fossa may sustain intense stresses independently of the subject’s head orientation relative to the blast.10 Findings that are consistent with this view include a positron-emission tomographic research showing reduced cerebellar basal glucose metabolism11 and a case survey documenting a lesion in cerebellar white matter on MRI after blast injury.12 In a swine model of experimental blast damage, traumatic axonal injury in several regions, which includes cerebellar tracts, was detected.13 We therefore hypothesized that traumatic axonal injury is a primary feature of human blast-related traumatic brain injury.Werner, Ph.D., Joshua S. Shimony, M.D., Ph.D., Abraham Z. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., Marcus E. Raichle, M.D., John R. Witherow, M.D., Raymond Fang, M.D., Stephen F. Flaherty, M.D., and David L. Brody, M.D., Ph.D.: Detection of Blast-Related Traumatic Human brain Damage in U.S. Army Personnel In today’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the number of blast-related traumatic brain injuries could be as high as 320,000.3,4 No human being autopsy studies conducted by using current immunohistochemical methods5,6 have been published.7,8 Computer simulations of the effects of blast-induced pressure waves on the mind claim that coup and contrecoup regions may be at the mercy of high stresses.9,10 Simulations also claim that the orbitofrontal regions and the posterior fossa may sustain intense stresses independently of the subject’s head orientation relative to the blast.10 Findings that are consistent with this view include a positron-emission tomographic research showing reduced cerebellar basal glucose metabolism11 and a case survey documenting a lesion in cerebellar white matter on MRI after blast injury.12 In a swine model of experimental blast damage, traumatic axonal injury in several regions, which includes cerebellar tracts, was detected.13 We therefore hypothesized that traumatic axonal injury is a primary feature of human blast-related traumatic brain injury.